Bauhaus: universal vs. international philosophy

From hipster coffeeshops to gothic rockbands to an entire neighbourhood in the city of Tel Aviv, it seems that a certain Bauhaus aesthetic has cemented itself in the collective consciousness. At least as far as the (upper) middle class is concerned, objects of dwelling should be spartan in design (“less is more” as the man used to say) and stay true to their accorded purpose (“form follows functions” as that other man used to say). Bulky chairs, folksy designs and figurative and religious art, on the other hand, are merely the outdated remnants of previous centuries.

mies-barcelona-pavilion-1929
Reconstruction of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s German Pavilion for the Barcelona World Exposition 1929. Photo by Hans Peter Schaefer, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

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